General Information

Admission to Connors State College (CSC) is open to high school graduates or
to any person whose high school class has graduated.

Admission to the College does not insure admittance to a particular course or
program of studies. Students may, in some instances, be required to meet program
entrance requirements or take preparatory classes to remove curricular
deficiencies before acceptance into a program or course.

There is no discrimination in the admission or recruitment of students on the
basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, ancestry, marital
status, religion, unfavorable military discharge or sexual orientation.

Residency Requirements Entry-Level Assessment First-time College Students Transfer Students & Returning Students
Curricular Proficiencies Curricular Requirements Non-High School Graduates Academic Policies and Procedures
Grades Grade Appeal Procedure Grade Reports Academic Probation
Academic Suspension Reinstatement of Suspended Students Repeating Courses Academic Reprieve

Residency Requirements

Regulations governing the residency status of students are based on the
policies of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education and apply to all
public colleges and universities in the State System.

Non-residents of Oklahoma are required to pay out-of-state tuition and fees.

The applicant must provide proof of residency in Oklahoma. Some examples are:
evidence of year-round residence, ownership of property, registration for and
voting in state general elections, filing an Oklahoma income tax return for the
most recent calendar year and payment of ad valorem property taxes.

Resident of Oklahoma: A
person who has lived continuously in Oklahoma for at least twelve months and
whose domicile is in Oklahoma. A person’s domicile is his or her true, fixed,
permanent home. It is a place he or she intends to remain and to which he or she
expects to return. A person can have more than one residence, but only one
domicile.

Independent person: A person who has majority
privileges and who is responsible for his or her own care, custody, and support.

Dependent person: A person under the care, custody and
support of a parent or other legal guardian.

Full-time student: A full-time undergraduate student is
enrolled in a minimum of twelve credit hours during a 16-week semester or a
minimum of six credit hours in a summer session.

For more information regarding residency requirements, please contact the
Office of Admission and Records.


Entry-Level Assessment


All first-time students and transfer students with fewer than twenty-four
(24) college credit hours
seeking admission or
re-admission into degree programs are required to participate in entry-level
assessment. The purpose of assessment is to assist faculty and admissions
personnel in making decisions that will assist students in attaining their
academic goals. Assessment is required in four subject areas: English,
mathematics, reading and science. Methods of assessment are as follows:


First-time College Students

Students 20 years of age or younger (high school graduates and non-graduates)
need ACT scores and possibly the Computerized Placement Test (CPT).

Students 21 years of age or older (high school graduates and non-graduates):
need ACT scores and/or Computerized Placement Test or voluntary remediation.


Transfer Students and Returning Connors Students

(Students who have not attended CSC within the last 12 months.)

Evaluation of previous college course work.

Review of ACT sub-scores.

Computerized Placement Test (CPT), if applicable.


Demonstration of Curricular Proficiencies and Course Placement

Course placement is used to maximize students’ success. All students,
including transfer students, must establish proficiency in English, mathematics,
reading and science before enrolling in college credit courses in those areas.
Students must also be proficient in reading before they can enroll in any
English course.

Students may establish proficiency by one the following methods:


English*

ACT sub-score of 19 or greater, or

CPT Sentence Skills score of 80 or better; and a CPT Reading
Skills score of 64 or better, or

Successful completion of Engl. 0123 – Fundamentals of English or Engl.
1113 – English Composition equivalent or I
.


Mathematics*

ACT sub-score of 19 or greater, or

CPT Elementary Algebra score of 73 or better, or

Successful completion of Math 0123 – Intermediate Algebra or Math 1513
– College Algebra


Science*

ACT sub-score of 19 or greater, or

CPT Elementary Algebra score of 53 or better and CPT Reading score of 64 or greater, or

Successful completion of Biol 0124 – Concepts of Science or any college-level science course.


Reading*

ACT sub-score of 19 or greater, or

CPT Reading Score of 64 or better, or

Successful completion of Engl. 0002 – Beginning Reading.

(Zero-level courses are not applied toward degree programs or graduation requirements). *Scores current as of spring 1999.)


Curricular Requirements

The following high school curricular requirements must be met for admission to all Public State System colleges and universities:

High School Curricular Requirements

Units

Course Areas

4

English (grammar, composition, and literature).

2

Lab Science (biology, chemistry, physics
or any lab science certified
by the school district; general science does not meet this requirement).

3

Mathematics (algebra I, algebra II,
geometry, trigonometry, math analysis, calculus).

2

History (including 1 unit of American
History).

1

Citizenship skills (economics, geography, government, non-western culture).

3

Additional units of subjects listed above or from computer science, foreign language, etc.

15

Total Units


Non-High School Graduates

High School Graduates Lacking Curricular Requirements

Students who lack high school curricular requirements are admissible into
Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), or Associate of Applied
Science (AAS) degree programs at Connors.

 

Students admitted to an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) program must
complete their high school curricular requirements prior to enrolling in an AA
or AS program.

 

Students must achieve proficiency(ies) and meet curricular requirements
during the first twenty-four (24) credit hours of enrollment or have all
subsequent enrollments restricted only to preparatory classes until all
proficiencies are achieved.

Curricular requirements/proficiencies can be met by:

 

English, Math, Reading, Science:

See section titled Demonstration of Curricular Proficiencies.

History:

Six (6) credit hours of history. Three (3) hours of which must be either
Hist 1483 or Hist 1493.

Citizenship Skills:

Three (3) hour credit course in either economics, geography, government, or
non-western culture.



Academic Policies and Procedures

Academic Advisors – Academic advisors help students
select the correct courses, review the course requirements in the subject field
they have selected to pursue and helps with academic problems that may occur.
Admissions advisors are available to assist students with their initial
registration. Faculty also serve as advisors.

Academic Good Standing – Students are in academic
good standing if they are not on academic probation or academic suspension.

Academic Graduation Honors – Students are eligible to
graduate with academic honors if they complete their graduation requirements and
achieve the following cumulative grade point averages:

  • 3.95 – 4.00 Summa Cum Laude
  • 3.80 – 3.94 Magna Cum Laude
  • 3.65 – 3.79 Cum Laude

Academic Notice – As early as the completion of their
first semester, freshman students with 30 or fewer credit hours are placed on
academic notice if they carry a cumulative GPA of 1.7 but less than 2.0.

Academic Probation – CSC requires students to maintain
a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) to remain in school. Students
will be placed on academic probation if they fail to meet the following
requirements:

Credit Hours Attempted

GPA Retention Requirement*

0-30 credit hours

1.7 GPA

30+ credit hours

2.0 GPA

*Excludes repeated or reprieved courses, remedial/preparatory courses,
physical education activity courses.

Academic Suspension – Students on academic probation
are placed on academic suspension if they fail to achieve the minimum cumulative
grade point average or to achieve a 2.0 GPA in regularly-graded course work
while on probation. Students placed on suspension will be dismissed from the
college for a specified period. Specific requirements are placed on students’
re-entry into college. (See requirements later in this section.)

ACT and SAT – The letters are acronyms for the American
College Test and the Scholastic Aptitude Test.
Both are national tests used for admission purposes. Each measures students’
knowledge in basic areas such as English, math, reading and science reasoning.

Advanced Standing Credit – These are credit hours that
have been earned elsewhere that can be accepted toward a degree. Such credit may
be given for work done at another higher education institution, by examination or
“testing out” or by military service.

Students at Connors may earn a maximum of eighteen (18) semester hours of
credit by examination. The following general rules apply:

Students eligible to receive advanced standing credit must be enrolled at
CSC.

Successful completion of twelve (12) or more semester credit hours must be
completed before the advanced standing credit is recorded on the students’
official transcripts.

The number of advanced standing hours students receive may not exceed the
number of resident credit hours they have earned.

Credit is awarded only for courses appearing in the current catalog and is
designated as advanced standing credit with the neutral grade of
“P”.

Credit can not be earned in any course in which credit has been earned in a
higher-level course in the same subject area.

Work taken at proprietary schools, secondary vocational-technical schools,
institutions offering clock-hours work, other non-collegiate institutions,
unaccredited institutions of higher education or experimental learning must be
evaluated and validated through examination or proficiency testing on a course
by course basis.

Connors recognizes CSC departmental tests, the College Level Examination
Program subject tests (CLEP), the Advanced Placement Program (APP) and the OSRHE
advanced standing exam for the college course Introduction to Business,

for advanced standing credit.

Advanced standing credit, once recorded and validated by Connors, is
transferable on the same basis as regularly earned course work.

Audit – Students who do not want to receive college
credit in a course may, with the approval of an instructor, audit the course as
a “visitor”. All course pre-requisites must be completed prior to
enrollment in the course. Prior to enrollment, students must file a Request
to Audit
in the Registrar’s Office.

Students wishing to change from audit to credit or credit to audit may do so
only during the posted drop/add period and must meet all requirements for
admission to Connors. Auditors may not petition for credit in an audited course
at a later date.

Class Attendance – Students are expected to attend
all classes. It is the students’ responsibility to follow each instructor’s
attendance policy as outlined in the instructor’s course syllabus.

Class Schedule – Connors’ publishes and distributes
a class schedule prior to the beginning of each semester. With the help of
academic advisors or faculty members, students make up their own individual
class schedules for each semester they are enrolled. Courses are designated in
the class schedule by course department, course number, description, time and
days, the room number and building name, and the instructor’s name.

Commuters – Commuters are students who live off campus
and drive to and from classes.

Computerized Placement Test – The Computerized
Placement Test (CPT) is an assessment tool developed by the College Board and
administered on microcomputers. It provides information about students’ ability
in reading, English, and math. At Connors, the CPT is used for entry-level
assessment.

Course Load – A course load is the number of credit
hours students may enroll in during a semester. Students in good academic
standing can enroll in a maximum of nineteen (19) credit hours in the fall or
spring semesters without prior approval of the Vice-President for Academics and
Technology. In the summer semester students may enroll in a maximum number of
ten (10) credit hours without approval.

Credit Hours – Students must attend a class one
classroom hour (usually 50 minutes) per week for sixteen weeks to earn one
credit hour. To earn three credit hours students must attend class three
classroom hours per week for sixteen weeks or an equivalent amount of minutes.
Students earn credit hours by successfully completing course requirements.

Degree Requirements – Degree requirements are those
requirements prescribed for the completion of a program of study. Requirements
may include a minimum number of hours, required GPA, prerequisite and elective
courses within the specified major and/or minor areas of study.

Dual Credit – Students may earn credits at another
institution in regular course work, extension, correspondence, distance
education or online courses while currently enrolled in residence. Approval for
dual credit must be secured in advance from the Vice-President for Academics and
Technology or the credits will not be accepted.

Final Exams – These exams are usually given during the
last week of classes each semester. The type of “finals” administered
in a course is left to the instructor’s discretion. Final exams are given on
specified dates identified in the current class schedule.

Freshmen – Students who have earned 30 or less credit
hours are classified as freshmen.

Full-Time/Part-Time Students – To be classified as
full-time, students must be enrolled in 12 or more hours during a fall or spring
semester or in 6 or more hours during a summer semester. Part-time students
enroll in 11 or fewer hours in the fall or spring or 5 hours or less in the
summer.

Honor Rolls – Students are placed on honor rolls for
grade point averages above certain specified levels. Students who earn 4.0 grade
point averages (A) are placed on the President’s Honor Roll, and students
who earn grade point averages of 3.0 to 3.9 are placed on the Dean’s Honor
Roll.
Students must carry a minimum of 12 college credit hours to be
eligible for honor rolls.

Junior/Community College – A junior/community college
is a two-year institution of higher education. Course offerings include a
transfer curriculum with credits transferable toward a bachelor’s degree at a
four-year college, and occupational/technical programs which are courses of
study designed to prepare students for employment in two years.

Lecture/Laboratory Classes – Lecture and laboratory
classes are the two most prominent types of classes in college. In lecture
classes, students attend class on a regular basis and the instructor presents
the course material. A laboratory or lab class requires students to perform
certain functions in controlled situations that help them test and understand
what they are being taught.

Non-Credit Courses –
These are classes or courses that do not meet the requirements for a certificate
or a degree. Non-credit courses may serve one of several purposes: to explore
new fields of study, increase proficiency in a particular profession, develop
potential or enrich life experiences and to fulfill high school curricular
requirements.

Open-Door Institution – Open-door institutions are
public two-year junior/community colleges. The term open door refers to an
admissions policy that states that anyone, whether they are a high graduate or
not, can be admitted to college provided that their high school class has
graduated.

Pre-requisite Courses – Prerequisite courses are
courses taken in preparation for another course. For example, Accounting I
is a prerequisite course for Accounting II and


Introduction to Psychology is a prerequisite for Developmental
Psychology
.

Registrar – The Registrar is responsible for the
maintenance of all academic records and maintains class enrollments, provides
statistical information on student enrollment, certifies athletic eligibility
and student eligibility for honor rolls, certifies the eligibility of veterans,
administers probation and retention policies, and verifies the completion of
degree requirements for graduation.

Semesters – An academic year is composed of semesters.
Fall and spring semesters last 16 weeks; the summer semester lasts eight weeks;
and the mini-mester sessions last approximately two weeks. Two mini-mesters are
conducted each year. The summer mini-mester is scheduled in August and the
winter mini-mester is scheduled after Christmas in late December and early
January.

Sophomores – Students who have earned 31 or more credit
hours are classified as sophomores.

Syllabus – The syllabus is an instructor’s action plan
for the class. It is a schedule of requirements, usually explaining the intent
of the course and what the students’ responsibilities are, such as assigned
readings, papers, and when the tests are due during the semester.

Withdrawal – Students may withdraw from either
individual courses or from the college during a semester according to
established procedures. Current class schedules outline withdrawal procedures.

 

 

Withdrawal from a single course:
Students must complete the following to withdraw or “drop” a class:

During the published drop/add period:

  • Complete the proper form in the Registrar’s Office.
  • The course will not appear on the students’ transcript.

After the drop/add period:

  • Secure the proper form from the Registrar’s Office.
  • Obtain the instructor’s signature.
  • Return form to Registrar’s Office.
  • Students will receive a grade of “W” on their transcript.

Students may not initiate a withdrawal and receive a “W” from a
single course after the last day to withdraw unless they have obtained
permission from the Vice-President for Academics and Technology.


Withdrawal from Connors: Students desiring to
completely withdraw from the College must complete the following:

  • Secure the proper form from the Registrar’s Office.
  • Obtain each instructor’s signature.
  • Also obtain the signature of the Financial Aid Officer, a Business Office
    official, and Assessment Officer.
  • Return the form to the Registrar’s office.
  • Students will receive a grade of “W” in each class.

Students may not initiate a withdrawal and receive grades of “W”
after the final exams have begun unless they have obtained permission from the
Vice-President for Academics and Technology.

 

Failure to withdraw properly from either a single course or from college will
result in grades of “F” appearing on students’ transcripts.

Grades

Grade

Status

Credit

GP Value

A

Excellent

1

4 pts.

B

Good

1

3 pts.

C

Average

1

2 pts.

D

Poor

1

1 pt.

F

Failing

0

0 pts.

P

Pass

Credit

Not computed

Au

Audit

None

Not computed

I

Incomplete

None

Not computed

NP

No Pass

None

Not computed

S

Satisfactory

None

Not computed

U

Unsatisfactory

None

Not computed

W

Withdrawal

None

Not computed

AW

Administrative Withdrawal

None

Not computed

Audit (Grade of “Au”): Students who do not
want to receive college credit in a course may, with the approval of an
instructor, audit the course as a “visitor”. Students who audit a
course shall have “Au” entered on their permanent record. Tuition and
fees are the same for audit classes as for credit classes. Students cannot ask
the institution at a later date to obtain college credit for a previously
audited course.

Incomplete (Grade of “I”): An “I”
is given to students who satisfactorily complete the majority of the work in a
course, but were prevented from completing the remaining course work due to
extenuating circumstances.

The conditions for removal of an “I” grade are indicated on the
appropriate forms provided by the instructor. The maximum time allowed for
students to remove an “I” is one semester. The Vice President for
Academics and Technology may authorize the adjustment of this time period under
extraordinary circumstances.

It is the students’ responsibility to satisfy the requirements stipulated
by the instructor at the time the “I” is assigned. It is the
responsibility of the instructor to initiate action to have the “I”
grade replaced by the students’ final earned grade.

Pass and No Pass (Grades of P and NP):

The “P” grade indicates course requirements have been met and
credit earned in courses designated as Pass/Fail or Pass/No Pass.

The “P” grade is also used to indicate credit earned through
advanced standing examinations for military service credit or in accordance with
the American Council of Education. The grades of “P” and
“NP” are GPA neutral.

Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory (Grades of S and U):

The grades of “S” and “U” are GPA neutral and are used for
non-credit seminars, workshops and “0”level remedial or preparatory
work. These grades do not apply toward graduation requirements.

Withdrawal and Administrative Withdrawal (Grades of “W” and
“AW”): Grades of “W” are GPA neutral
and are used when students initiate procedures to formally withdraw from
class(es). Students may not initiate a withdrawal from a single course after the
posted last day to withdraw each semester unless they have obtained written
permission from the Vice-President for Academics and Technology. It is the
student’s responsibility to initiate a withdrawal from class(es). (See current
class schedule for “Last Day to Withdraw” date).

The grade of “AW” may be assigned by the Vice-President for
Academics and Technology to indicate that the student has been
“involuntarily” withdrawn by the institution due to extraordinary
circumstances such as, but not limited to, prolonged illness, accidents or
disciplinary action.

Grade Point Average – To
determine the grade points for each course, multiply the number of points for
each assigned letter grade by the number of credit hours for the course. Add the
grade points to get the total grade points earned by the semester. Divide the
number of grade points by the number of hours attempted for the semester to get
the grade point average.

Formula = GP HA=GPA.



Grade Appeal Procedure

The student grade appeal procedure is as follows:

The student discusses the grade in question with the class instructor, if
no agreement is reached;

The student prepares a written appeal and presents it to the appropriate
division chair. If the division chair is the student’s instructor, the
appeal is presented to the Vice-President for Academics and Technology. The
grade appeal must be initiated within six months from the time the student
receives his or her contested grade.

The student has the right to appear before a Grade Appeals Committee if the
decision of the appropriate division chair is not satisfactory. The CSC
Registrar chairs the Grade Appeals Committee. The Vice-President for Academics
and Technology selects the faculty members to serve on the committee. None of
the committee members selected to hear an appeal will be from the academic
division involved.

At a Grade Appeals Committee meeting the following events will occur:

  • The student clearly states the reason for the appeal.
  • The instructor provides evidence indicating how the grade was assigned.
  • The committee evaluates the evidence and providing reasons for their
    decision, prepares a written report.

As a final course of action, the student can make an appeal to the
Vice-President for Academics and Technology and then to the President. The
Vice-President for Academics and Technology has the authority to adjust the
grade based upon the information provided.



Grade Reports

Students’ grade reports are mailed to their home addresses at the
conclusion of each semester or session. All admission requirements and/or all
financial obligations to the college must be met before grades are released.

 


Retention Policies

Connors’ retention policies are designed to serve the students’
educational welfare in obtaining their educational objectives within a
reasonable time frame.


Academic Notice

As early as the completion of the first semester of enrollment, freshman
students with 30 or fewer credit hours are placed on academic notice if they
carry a cumulative GPA of 1.7 but less than 2.0.



Academic Probation

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) to
remain in school. Students will be placed on academic probation if they fail to
meet the following requirements:

Credit Hours Attempted

GPA Retention Requirement*

0-30 credit hours

1.7 GPA

30+ credit hours

2.0 GPA

*Excludes repeated or reprieved courses, remedial/preparatory courses and/or
physical education activity courses.


Academic Suspension

Students on academic probation are placed on academic suspension if they fail
to achieve the minimum cumulative grade point average or to achieve a 2.0 GPA in
regularly graded course work while on probation. Students placed on suspension
will be dismissed from the college for a specified period. Specific requirements
are placed on students’ re-entry into college.

Academic Suspension Appeals Procedure

Students who have been placed on academic suspension may petition the
Academic Suspension Appeals Committee for reinstatement based on documented
evidence of extraordinary personal circumstances that may have contributed to
their academic deficiencies.

The suspension appeal procedure is as follows:

Students petition the Vice-President for Academics and Technology in
writing detailing the extraordinary circumstances that contributed to their
academic deficiency.

The Vice-President for Academics and Technology will call a meeting of the
Academic Suspension Appeals Committee. This committee is composed of the Vice
President for Student Services (chair), the admissions counselor, Registrar
and a faculty member.

Students will appear individually before the Committee and state the
reasons for their request for appeal. After the students’ appeal, the
Committee will make one of the following decisions:

  • Appeal denied – suspension upheld.
  • Appeal granted – conditional probational enrollment granted.
  • Appeal granted – no conditions.

If, in the students’ opinion, the decision of the Committee is not
satisfactory, they may appeal to the Vice-President for Academics and
Technology and then to the President.



Reinstatement of Suspended Students

First time Suspensions of Connors’ Students: One
regular (fall or spring) semester must elapse before first-time suspended
students are applicable for re-admission. The students’ readmission will be
probationary and must not exceed more than fifteen (15) semester credit hours in
a regular semester and seven (7) hours during a summer session.

Students re-admitted on probation must maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester while
on probation or raise their cumultive GPA to current retention standards. (See
Retention Policy section).

Second-time Suspensions of Connors’ Students:
Students suspended for a second time can not return to Connors until such they
as they have demonstrated, by attending another institution, their ability to
raise their cumulative GPA to retention standards. (See Retention Policy section).

Students Suspended from Other Institutions:

Students suspended from other Oklahoma State System institutions may request
admission to Connors State College through the Registrar’s Office.

Students will be admitted under the same conditions as set forth under First
Time Suspensions of Connors’ students
.



Repeating Courses

Connors’ students may repeat courses in which the original earned grade was
either a “D” or an “F”. Students may repeat up to a maximum
of four (4) courses not to exceed eighteen (18) credit hours. It should be noted
that the second grade earned will count toward the calculation of the retention
and graduation GPA, even if it is lower than the first grade.

Both original and repeated grades earned in a course will be used in the
calculation of the cumulative GPA. Only the repeated grades will be used
in the calculation of the retention and graduation GPA.

Students wishing to repeat more than four (4) courses or eighteen (18) credit
hours may do so with the understanding that all original and repeated grades
will be used in the calculation of the retention and graduation GPAs.

If students repeat a course in which they received a grade of “C”
or better, both grades are used in calculation of the GPA and no additional
hours will be earned.

Students wishing to repeat courses should contact the Registrar’s Office.
The notification should be made during the semester in which the course or
courses are to be repeated.


Academic Reprieve

Students may request an Academic Reprieve of all course work taken in up to
two consecutive semesters. Requirements for the academic reprieve include:

At least three years must have elapsed between the time the grades were
earned and the reprieve request.

Students must be enrolled at CSC and prior to requesting the reprieve,
students must have earned a GPA of 2.0 or higher with no grade lower than an
“C” in a minimum of twelve credit hours of regularly graded course
work at Connors State College.

The request may be for one semester or term of enrollment or two
consecutive semesters or terms. The semester(s) requested must have a GPA of
less than 2.00 or contain “F” grades.

Students must submit a written request including copies of all college
transcripts to the Vice-President for Academics and Technology for
consideration of an academic reprieve.

Students may not receive more than one academic reprieve during their
academic career.

If you have any questions about academic and retention policies, contact the
Office of the Registrar, Warner campus, (918)463-2931.